Barge Type: Know Your Spitzen From Your Clip

Barge Type: Know Your Spitzen From Your Clip

For newcomers to barge holidays, all barges may look the same. However, there are many types of ships with striking differences in history and design. This model evolved over 200 years, adapting to changing conditions and technology. In Europe, the barge – ships barges – connecting the English Channel, Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea. Here is a brief overview of the most common vessels you might encounter on your barge vacation.
Tjalks and Klippers Barge Type: Know Your Spitzen From Your Clip

This barging tradition can be traced back to the seventeenth century. Originally wind-powered Tjalks were built of wood; In the nineteenth century, ship builders began to consider the possibility of iron and on twentieth century steel properties exploited by this industry. Therefore, the modern version of Tjalk is constructed of iron or steel, yet retains the stern arch of indigenous wood.

Designed for fast-flowing estuaries and rivers in the Netherlands, the tough Klipper is always built of iron or steel. The use of steel leads to a stronger vessel, although this introduces the danger of corrosion. Klipper’s steering sat under a stern round and ridden with wheels. Barge Type: Know Your Spitzen From Your Clip

Beurtmotor and Luxemotor

Beurtmotor is used for passengers and cargo and often travels to a reliable schedule, replacing steam-powered steamers. It became even more popular with the introduction of diesel engines because their scheduling was more consistent than ever before. Like other barges, Beurtmotor was built to navigate the shallow waters – anywhere between 3 and about 10 feet of water. However this is not a limitation, as most inland waters in western Europe conform to this requirement.

Luxemotor trailblazing was built in the early 20th century and was the first barge to have its own machine. Driving on Beurtmotor’s success, they are quite luxurious with plenty of space – including kitchens and toilets – as well as a pointy bow that is ideal for more open waters.

Spitz

Spitz has a long and varied history. They were built to the standard of Freycinet imposed by Napoleon during the standardization period, and the ship was first withdrawn by hand (or horse). However, after the Second World War many Belgian Spitz ships were kitted out with tank machines that were often disabled. With some adjustments at the stern to fix the wheel, the Spitz Motor version is designed for canals in France, Belgium and the Netherlands.

European Air Line: Our Fleet

The European Airway fleet includes a barge with lots of history behind them. Vacation barges match the history lover and cruise ship enthusiasts. For example, L’Art de Vivre – the oldest fleet – is an English model and built in the First World War to supply allied forces in the Somme. The beautiful Rosa is the Dutch Clipper carrying a variety of cargo in the early 20th century Dutch. Both now enjoy retirement by walking the beautiful streets of France, lovingly recovering in a way that celebrates their stunning legacy. Barge Type: Know Your Spitzen From Your Clip

Paul Newman is a Marketing and E-Systems Executive for European Waterways, the most respected all-inclusive luxury barge provider in France and other major destinations. Part of an experienced barge team, Paul first queued to support a slow-paced barging cruise facility for anyone looking for a unique holiday experience. Barge Type: Know Your Spitzen From Your Clip