Try this Traditional Cuisine for your Scottish Cruise

Try this Traditional Cuisine for your Scottish Cruise

If the only thing you think about when someone mentions Scottish food is Martian rock and fried macaroni baked into a pie crust, you’ll be surprised by Scottish cruises. On our way down the Caledonian Canal, our on-board chef likes to celebrate excellent local cuisine and – I promise – there will not be a visible Mars Bar.
Of course, in a country with a river full of wild salmon, huge estates filled with deer, sheep and cattle (other than for grouse birds, pheasants and forest donkeys), it is ridiculous to imagine that the night chip shops in the cities offer the best. of his cooking. Our Scottish voyage down the canal – which runs from Inverness in the east to Fort William in the west – meandering through some of Scotland’s most beautiful and lush countryside, with access to some of its freshest local materials. Try this Traditional Cuisine for your Scottish Cruise

Suitable Material for Royalty

Traditionally, the British and Scottish aristocracies have looked to the rural parts of Scotland to provide some of its most exclusive materials. Whether it’s tasty venison or Aberdeen Angus, fresh salmon from the river or lobster, crabs, shellfish, shellfish and shrimp caught offshore, Scotland has long been considered the closet for the top tables of the British Isles. .

Scotch fare is warm

But not just the rich and famous people who have enjoyed the wealth of good food on offer north of the border. Traditional Scottish dishes such as haggis, Scotch broth, and Cullen skink are all well-known around the world.

Many visitors to Scotland are a bit intimidated by what might be considered a national dish of the country: haggis. It is made from liver chopped liver, liver and oatmeal all mixed together with various herbs before put into the stomach of the lamb. It may sound too intriguing, but believe me there is a good reason why the Scots eat this delicious. If you are feeling adventurous try it – it is really delicious served with custom neeps and tatties (mashed horseradish flavored or potato rolls and mashed potatoes with nutmeg). Once you have found haggis love, you may want to try the sausage as well.

Another rustic treatment worth a try while you’re on your Scottish voyage is a traditional haddock soup known as the Cullen skink. Made from smoked haddock, onions and potatoes, this is warming up after a brush with Scottish weather. For a warmer stew that looks more like a stew, try the Scotch broth. Traditionally made with goat meat, but now often found using lamb, soup is removed with barley and fresh root vegetables. Try this famous soup, or any other Scottish dish, served with traditional local bannocks (stove bread made from grains) or oatcakes (savory biscuits made from wheat flour).

On your Scottish voyage you will find that Scottish food is, like a landscape, honest, healthy and rustic – it makes a wonderful discovery, filled with unexpected taste.

Paul Newman is a Marketing and E-Systems Executive for European Waterways, a provider of luxury yachts and luxury cruises that are most respected throughout Europe. If you are looking for the most interesting Scottish voyage, or travel in other places of interest, European Waterways is the ideal choice. Part of an experienced barge team, Paul first queued to support a slow-paced barging cruise facility for anyone looking for a unique holiday experience. Try this Traditional Cuisine for your Scottish Cruise